Your “cozy warm feel” idea sounds nice. It means a lot to us floor guys :). I’m buying new cabinets and granite and want to go with dark cherry and a traditional look. Unfortunately no, we haven’t worked with Blackbutt yet. If so have a look at some of the colors in this post: https://napervillehardwood.com/blog/rubio-monocoat-pre-color-easy/. This will give the best “color match” between the different floors but may be too dark for your taste. The kitchen is cheap natural colored pergo, which looks fine against the Red Chestnut. I would also seriously look into hardwax oils as these can be touched up very easily if the dog gets out of hand. Fantastic. Ciao Tadas! Let us know how it goes. Our furniture is similiar in coloring. Any suggestions on how to fill gaps? I currently have my kitchen and dining in this wood in a honey colour and want it to be more Jacobean 2750 in colour, but I have concerns it’s not suitable to stain and the current floor’s sanding marks may stand out from the new wood. Fluorescence: A Secret Weapon in Wood Identification, Bow Woods (from a mathematical perspective), Brazilian Rosewood, East Indian, and Other Rosewoods, Genuine Lignum Vitae and Argentine Lignum Vitae, BOOK: WOOD! Please help so confused. These floors are beautiful random width french white oak. Has it been sanded yet? Just what I was searching for! One last resort thing you could do if you decided to go with a 3 coat surface finish instead of Rubio is to carefully paint the joints out between the first coat and second coat. Anything between 30-50% is good. Unfortunately we have three different types of wood downstairs – oak in the dining and living/family room, spruce in the kitchen, fir in the sun room. After researching I think it may be called “bleed back”. One other thing to note about dark stained floors is that maintenance will be somewhat more difficult. It is highly helpful for me. The main ones are…. Also do you think that nailing them every 10″-12″, and glueing the same distance (keeping the glue out of the joints) is enough to hold them down. I think the 12′ – 16′ lengths would definitely be marketable. Thanks so much with any advice with this. Thanks so much and hope you are doing well! Unfortunately that’s not how matching wood colors works. If the finish doesn’t adhere properly, I’m sorry to say, but your husband may be sanding all over again :(. Also when looking at that floor remember you’re not seeing a real representation of the actual color. Our apt. This was the old type of finish before the new VOC laws. But if you’d like to change the color of your hardwood floors and have a surface finish applied, then they will need to be stained or have a pre-treatment done to them. Sorry you’re having trouble. I have some QS stock in the barn. That might work well. Ebony floors definitely have the Wow factor if that’s what you’re after. There is not much info out there to reduce the red without going very dark-I just want a warm brown. it didn’t give me a nice grey. We are sanding and staining our red oak floors in several weeks. We have a few gaps that I can see the floorboards, it’s glaring with a dark floor another was filled with some filler but it looks cakey, these are in main areas that can’t be covered by a rug. Make sure to do a big sample area too with finish applied (that will change the color) so you’re confident that’s the final look you want. Hopefully there aren’t too many dark joints. What is the color of the floor in your first picture dated May 26 2011. We use DuraSeal stains. Since your floors are so old and you may not be able to sand them again, I would also suggest looking at a hardwax oil like Rubio Monocoat. I saw that people asked what the stains were in the first and third photos of your article but nobody has asked about the second photo. I want a warm rich feeling and I am tired of the golden yellow color. But my oak floor, now sanded, is nearly white in color and when the guys put down the sample (a 2 ft square) of English Chestnut it didn't color it nearly as dark as your wood trim. The original post and everyone’s comments were super helpful. We love the natural color but some tell us it will turn very yellow and we dont want that. I applied 3 coats of waterborne polyurethane. Please answer the question below before submitting your comment: © Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved. Color/Appearance: Has a light to medium brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color. I could work with you to have it custom milled, if you would like a large supply of it. 2. Thanks. We do not want really dark floors. You say you used 50 percent rosewood stain. Tadas your site is extremely helpful. This is the stain color chart from DuraSeal…, And here are the colors available from Bona…. I’m sure they’ll look great in the end. Just found your blog – great information. Is this right? P.S. Hi Greg, not sure you are still interested in Chestnut Oak, but I harvest this stuff all the time. He chose the Jacobean but it sure looks like Ebony to me. Something like this: http://www.houzz.com/photos/87686/Oakley-Home-Builders-traditional-kitchen-chicago, Any advice you could give would be great!

10 Barriers To Critical Thinking, Kumon Grade 3 Writing, Morning Dew Ukulele, Abbas Name Meaning In Urdu, Corns Meaning In Malayalam, Denon Dn-200br Specs, Religion And Culture Pdf,